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20121224
20121224
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the business is in the mid-sized to smaller communities who have even fewer resources than the large cities, less expertise. if you take options off the table, it will be, well, what we've done for the last 40 years, and right now we have some real challenges. so any good manager is going to want to have a maximum number of options. allbee: you've got to have a serious conversation with your constituency about what it costs to deliver the service that you're required to deliver and to deliver the service that they want. paolicelli: and i think, ultimately, the responsibility is going to be down to the user of this commodity. it costs money to operate these systems. there's a need to continually invest in these systems. there's going to be new regulations. it's all going to cost money. allbee: for all practical purposes, people are going to have to pay about twice as much for these services as they currently do. because a lot of the pipe that went in, a lot of the plants that went in, went in with very sizable portions of federal grant money, mechanisms that are no longer in place. narrator:
for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
easier for small and large contractors to do business in the city. i want to thank monique and the port for their confidence in public works and for the strong relationship and partnership that we forged through completing this project. i'd like to acknowledge the hard work of vortex, [speaker not understood], john miller and alex with vortex. i'd like to thank matt hughey with [speaker not understood], and i'd like to especially thank my public works team, ray louie, laura lombardi, [speaker not understood], and tim o'sullivan. with them i can tackle the most complex project in san francisco. thank you all. (applause) >> so, as you enjoy this space, first of all, please come back. bring your families. bring your friends. we're proud to have another new space for all of the residents and our favorite dogs who walk along here, as well as the many visitors. as you've heard mentioned today, it has taken a huge community of people to get this done. i'm very pleased to see representatives of the fisherman's wharf community benefit district, the fisherman's wharf restaurant association, all t
are no or low cost but others like caa have large potential costs to the city and we didn't do that analysis. >> there is financial considerations. there is political considerations, and so if we have a document -- if we go to the next lafco meeting in january -- whenever it is. we will see the schedule later. it might be too quick to do that in a month and a different resolution for that, but i think that si process that is essential that we go to and provide a road map. >> and the last page in the report and lists the recommendations and near term, mid-term or long-term so the next two to three or three to seven or longer term so we started that work but certainly a lot more to do. >> i also have a question on the emphasis on pg&e and i am wondering if you could talk more about that. i am curious why there is equal treatment of clean power sf and pg&e since you have a program with clean power sf where the city has more control over it and i am wondering if you could talk about that, and by the way was pg&e on the task force? >> yes pg&e was a member of the task force and they did ask at
to leverage that in the program to result in private investment and here in the city and those are really important to get the large scale renewable energy generation and additionally we might be able to use the program to efficient these programs and similar programs and it could be an important piece of getting to that 100% goal. >> in terms of the renewable energy study what's the next step. >> so we presented this to the mayor last week and he is very interested in moving forward and particular on some of the legislative pieces, and starting to -- for example, the exame
patriotic types, right wing. for the most part are completely groundless. in this community, in the city, veterans by and large were warmly embraced. when they had true problems, when they were in dire need and no one else is taking care of them, not their families, not their peashooter tapes. this san francisco to take care of these men. >> i really wanted to reinforce that david. the haight-ashbury clinic with its nonjudgmental approach, although that's in the 70s came to her clinic for detox and medical problems and the va decided they needed to find where ever the vets went and that is when the haight-ashbury got their first-ever government funding. government officials came across an wanted to give me money. i said last year you try to arrest me and i'd like to give me money. it was a vietnam vet. it has a very rich history. the head with glen ross whittaker came out a vietnam vet area, country joe and the fish. it really caught violence over here on haight streak come attack court came down. i can just see it right now they have this big shields. they beat the out of all the hippie
, and largely driven by our statutes. this governor is very pro- expansion of business. and in favor of things that make this city and state great. there is mileage from your local representatives on this. the governor is going to be supportive of whenever you want to do in the city of san francisco. -- what ever you want to do in the city of san francisco. >> i own a corner bar and i'm basically in the same boat. i am an entrepreneur and i want to open another bar and not got a lease in hand. i'm in danger of losing the lease because i cannot find a license. what i am wondering is, is it possible for that number -- i did not know we were saturated. is it possible for that number to change? can we control the market driven licenses, perhaps? you hear of a license is going for sale in new york or new jersey for half a million dollars. that makes a small-business man like me, that boggles my mind. and it boggles my mind to think i might have to go up to two hundred thousand dollars. what is the likelihood of the supply increasing to meet the demand? the city is growing. in south beach, there are
could summarize what is before the puc with that? >> i can and we have city attorney here who is also familiar with this and perhaps could fill in some of the gaps for me. the code of conduct largely came out of the -- the law that created the code of conduct requirement came out of the experience that pg&e and marin energy had when marin energy launched its program so the code of conduct puts certain restrictions on both parties, the utility, in our case pg&e and on us as a cca. broadly speaking it prohibits either party from misleading customers. it requires that any expenditures that pg&e incurs to actively market against the program cannot be reimbursed by rate payers and shared by shareholders. it allows pg&e to answer questions and educate about their program and how it compares to our program. it requires both parties to work with the california public utilities commission public advisor's office to create a comparison document that would be made able by all parties on the two program offerings. so that gives you some of the key elements. >> and the code of conduct you sai
walking into the intersection was just killed yesterday on biel and market. i'm shocked that this city would really think that this project, on fell street, and oak street, with such a large number of folks who are impacted, should be approved without some kind of an environmental review. i have worked in the environmental review area at various times -- >> president chiu: thank you very much. next speaker. >> my name is -- i live and work in that neighborhood, and i own a business at the corner of oak and divis. i'm also shocked there is no review at all of the impact on the streets and the delivery systems and all the things that are happening in that area. if you even try to block the streets with some cones and test it out for a minute to see what the real impact is, it will probably give us a better picture of what this feels and looks like. i've been delivering in that area for -- since -- at least 15, 18 years. and i drive through that street all the time, day in and day out. and i really feel like a real true study is very important to that area. i'm all for the safety of the b
to stop making t-12 bulbs. >> it is scheduled for extinction. >> along the same lines, the city of san francisco is considering an ordinance to require the conversion from the old 212 to t-8 efficiency fixtures or higher. >> there are discussions. many of the large owners have gone to retrofits because there is a very good payback on it. the only commercial buildings that haven't done that are the smaller buildings where there is not as much money involved. >> so what other energy-efficient leading do we see these days? >> in both residential and commercial applications, you're seeing a trend toward compact fluorescent bulbs where instead of the conventional edison-based socket. >> the edison base, the screw type socket. >> the standard screw-in socket that everybody uses. >> all are edison, right. >> now you're seeing pictures that have four-pin contact fluorescent bulbs. these are even more efficient -- they're approximately as fingerprint as a t-8. so they get about five times as much energy efficiency as a conventional light bulb. this goes into a special socket. you have to buy th
to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to carry the water to protect you from flooding, you need to have almost one mile on each side of the river set aside for transport of rain. so in order for the city to have use of those lands around the river, concrete made it possible to have minimum land so the water can be carried to the ocean in the fastest possible way. but, unfortunately, because of population growth and poor housekeeping, people are putting a lot of pollutants on the street and the streets are the openings to our stormwater sewer system. in an average year, 4,000 to 5,000 tons of trash ends up in long beach. man: we've created a system t
a large community circle around a anna kournikova. loveville noontime event is to urge people to find ways to prevent similar incidents in the future. people in new york city who want tighter gun laws are making their voices heard, marching over the brooklyn bridge last night carrying candles. they stopped in the middle of the abridged read the names of the children and adults killed at sandy hook elementary school. >> the debate over guns in america took center stage on the sunday morning talk shows. the national rifle association is not backing down from a controversial idea of putting armed guards in schools. >> i don't understand why you cannot just four minutes imagine that when that horrible monster tried to shoot his way into sandy hook school and that if a good guy with a gun had been there, he might of been able to stop largest gun rights lobby also says the white house gun violence task force led by vice president joe biden may try to undermine the second amendment. 5:0732 degrees. >> still ahead in reston, showing off another amazing holiday display. how it is helping a great ca
on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and passionate about his work right to the end. it was also very instructive to recognize it is not work if you love what you do. >> let me follow-up on that. you have spoken about how you have never taken the easy path. you are drawn to where the heat is. that takes a tremendous amount of courage. why are you drawn to that? >> i do not know the answer completely except that i grew up as the oldest daughter and oldest granddaugh
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)